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Central Park, NYC Elopement: Michael & Lynn

Sascha Reinking Photography

Nov. 25, 2015

To understand Michael and Lynn’s proposal, you have to understand a little bit about each of them… Michael is the kind of guy who thinks flash mobs and large dramatic gestures are always a good choice, and is a firm believer in symbols and synergy. Lynn on the other hand humors Michael’s symbols and shudders at the thought of public attention. He is much more understated and quiet.

Michael began planning the proposal in late fall 2014 and it took place in London while they were on vacation in January 2015, on the last afternoon of their stay. He contacted The London Times and secured a “forthcoming marriages” announcement to be published on Jan. 23; the day he would propose. He scheduled high tea at 4 p.m. because the proposal would always be this number sequence 1234 (Jan. 23 at 4:00). The restaurant was in on the plan and had a perfect table in front of the roaring fire ready for them.

Sascha Reinking Photography
Lynn got suspicious on the day of the proposal because Michael spent the better part of the afternoon trying to find a paper to have with him during the proposal. (Michael did manage to keep Lynn from the Times all day, even hiding the one that had shown up at the hotel).
Sascha Reinking Photography
Sascha Reinking Photography
Sascha Reinking Photography
Sascha Reinking Photography
As they settled in for tea, Michael began to stumble his way through the question. Lynn stopped him and said, “If you are asking me to marry you, the answer is yes”. Michael replied, “That’s good, because it is in the Times”. Michael started to pull out his phone to post the good news and Lynn asked that he not. Michael told him that then he needed to call … and rattled off a list of people, which prompted Lynn to ask who knew about the proposal. Michael’s reply: “It might be easier to tell you who didn’t know!”
Sascha Reinking Photography
Sascha Reinking Photography
Sascha Reinking Photography

The grooms always wanted a small ceremony with family and close friends, immediately followed by a party to celebrate. They began planning a wedding in the spring of 2015, before marriage equality was legal in their home state, and it wasn’t easy. Michael’s best friend is a Methodist minister, but couldn’t perform the ceremony. They had a rabbi friend who would be able, but they aren’t Jewish. They chose a venue, band and caterer but had bad experiences with nearly all of them.  Frustrated, they decided to elope.

Sascha Reinking Photography
They chose Central Park as the location of the ceremony for its history, prominence in the original park design, and the sculpture of Bethesda Fountain. Each piece of the day had, for them, a deeper meaning and connection.
Sascha Reinking Photography
They followed their ceremony with dinner and the last show of the Rockettes that night. When they returned to their room, they discovered a surprise gluten-free, sugar-free, dairy-free wedding cake and champagne.

They returned home to Indianapolis and hosted a pre-planned “thanksgiving” dinner for their families, previously touted as an opportunity to meet before the “big day” planned for April 30, 2016. Their marriage was announced in the New York Times on Sunday, Nov. 29.

Sascha Reinking Photography
Sascha Reinking Photography
Michael and Lynn used passages and symbols that were meaningful to them. They used the e.e. cummings poem “I carry you in my heart” for the basis of their ceremony and on their announcement. They also chose a passage from SCOTUS about marriage equality. They followed the Episcopalian Rite for Marriage.
Sascha Reinking Photography
Michael carried his grandmother’s Bible and wore cufflinks from Lynn’s maternal uncle and his father’s retirement watch. Lynn wore his father’s cufflinks and watch. They found sixpence coins (from the traditional “something borrowed, something blue, something old, and something new…”) from the year of each of their parents’ nuptials and wore them in their shoes. They were married on the Oak Moon – the November full Moon, considered good luck for a married couple as it shines brightly all the first night of the marriage.
Sascha Reinking Photography

Their LGBTQ-Friendly Vendors

Photographer: Sascha Reinking Photography // Event Venue:Central Park, Cherry Hill // Officiant: Sarah Ritchie Weddings  

Submitted via Two Bright Lights

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