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Real Wedding

Colorado Mountain Wedding: Katie & Jayme

Alison Rose Photography

September 13, 2014

Katie and Jayme wanted the primary focus of their day to be a beautiful wedding, where the guests would enjoy themselves, absent of the consumerist culture that typically surrounds wedding planning. Katie is creative and crafty and wanted the wedding to reflect that as well. To accomplish these goals, the brides thought outside of the wedding box, never looked at a “wedding checklist” and avoided including anything “just because they were supposed to.”

In some ways, planning a “gay wedding” helped their goals. Though they wanted to maintain enough of the structure of a traditional wedding (same-sex marriage was not actually legal in Colorado at the time) that it felt like a “real wedding,” many traditions were so heteronormative that it was easy to dismiss them. It was also important that they were planning more than just a party, but their future marriage. Jayme and Katie had a lot of conversations around what they wanted their lives to look like and how they wanted to treat each other.

Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography

A wedding website with frequently asked questions helped smooth the way for guests who had not yet experienced a gay wedding. Katie and Jayme addressed some of the more common questions like “are you both going to wear a dress?” and “what should I expect?” Their responses were given with humor and love and helped everyone feel part of their union and wedding experience.

Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography

The venue search was in some ways unique to the vision that Jayme and Katie had for their day. Lovers of Chipotle, they decided it was the perfect source of their wedding meal and thus had to find a venue that permitted outside catering. Denver-area venues proved to be “ridiculously overpriced,” but they discovered a gem in La Veta, Colorado—a home on the vacation rental website VRBO that sleeps 20, for half of what it would have cost to rent a place in Denver for six hours. The location was three hours outside of Denver and necessitated cutting the guest list in half. The intimate party became a “giant sleepover with (their) besties, complete with s’mores around a campfire.”

Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography

While the brides ate a ton of cake during their planning process, they ultimately decided that transporting a cake for three hours was not in their best interest. Similarly, they rejected details like place cards and favors and instead focused on the food, the beverages and taking care of their guests.

Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography

The ceremony itself was very meaningful for both. Jayme and Katie had to drive to Raton, New Mexico, right before the wedding weekend to get legally married. However, this meant that their ceremony could be free from convention and instead be highly personalized. In fact, about a month before the wedding, they escaped to the woods, disconnected, had some wine and wrote their ceremony from scratch. A good friend officiated the personal exchange.

Alison Rose Photography
Alison Rose Photography
Katie and Jayme offered their advice to other couples by suggesting strongly that you not “feed the should” (don’t focus on what others say you “should” have or do). They also recommended eating lots of cake while planning, and at all costs, hiring a great photographer like their phenomenal artist, Alison.

Their LGBTQ-Friendly Vendors

Photographer: Alison Rose Photography 

Submitted via Two Bright Lights

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